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Hepatitis (Hepatitis virus)

Hepatitis (Hepatitis virus) under a microscope!

• HAV is spread primarily by unsanitary food and water
• HBV is transmitted in bodily fluids and can cause chronic liver disease
• HCV is perhaps the most dangerous: no vaccine is available
• HDV occurs only in the presence of HBV
• HEV is relatively mild and non-chronic
• HFV and HGV are newly identified; their connection with liver disease is debated



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• HAV* is transmitted primarily by unsanitary food and water (frequently found in developing countries), or by direct contact with an infected person. It is non-chronic and relatively mild, though symptoms can include jaundice, fatigue, nausea, and fever. Vaccines are available.

• HBV is transmitted by bodily-fluids and is far more serious. Chronic liver disease caused by HBV results in death in 15-25% of chronically infected persons. Vaccines are available and are highly recommended.

• HCV is perhaps the most dangerous of the hepatitis viruses. Like HBV, it is transmitted by bodily-fluids. It causes severe liver damage in 70% of chronically infected persons; there is no vaccine available; and 80% of infected persons have no symptoms or signs of the disease – so not only are they at risk, but they can pass it to others unknowingly. Those at particular risk and for whom testing is advised include:

• I.V. drug users – most infections are due to illegal injection drug use
• Blood transfusion recipients before 1992 (prior to donor screening)
• People with undiagnosed liver problems
• Infants born to infected mothers

• HDV is similar to HBV, and only occurs in its presence, so vaccination-protection for HDV is, for practical purposes, available.

• HEV is relatively mild and non-chronic; it produces symptoms similar to HAV and is transmitted similarly. However, no vaccine is available.

• HFV and HGV are newly identified; their connection with liver disease remains controversial.

*Hepatitis viruses are typically identified by letters, e.g. HAV for Hepatitis A Virus. Virus information is provided by the Center for Disease Control.

  • Hepatitis cluster
  • Hepatitis plush
Size Specs Fan Photos
Hepatitis (Hepatitis virus) Hepatitis (Hepatitis virus) GMUS-PD-0380
$9.95
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Product Details

Additional Information

Sizes Giantmicrobes are based on actual microbes, cells, organisms and other critters, only 1,000,000 times actual size!
Gigantic (GG) 16-24"
XL (XL) 10-15"
Original (PD) 5-8"
Minis (MM) 2-4" each
Keychain (KC) 2-4" with clip
Materials Plush from all new materials. Stuffed with polyester fiber fill. Surface washable: sponge with water & soap, air dry.
Packaging Each plush microbe includes a printed card with fun, educational and fascinating facts about the actual microbe or cell.
Safety Every product meets or exceeds U.S. and European standards for safety. For ages 3 and up.

All about Hepatitis (Hepatitis virus)

• HAV* is transmitted primarily by unsanitary food and water (frequently found in developing countries), or by direct contact with an infected person. It is non-chronic and relatively mild, though symptoms can include jaundice, fatigue, nausea, and fever. Vaccines are available.

• HBV is transmitted by bodily-fluids and is far more serious. Chronic liver disease caused by HBV results in death in 15-25% of chronically infected persons. Vaccines are available and are highly recommended.

• HCV is perhaps the most dangerous of the hepatitis viruses. Like HBV, it is transmitted by bodily-fluids. It causes severe liver damage in 70% of chronically infected persons; there is no vaccine available; and 80% of infected persons have no symptoms or signs of the disease – so not only are they at risk, but they can pass it to others unknowingly. Those at particular risk and for whom testing is advised include:

• I.V. drug users – most infections are due to illegal injection drug use
• Blood transfusion recipients before 1992 (prior to donor screening)
• People with undiagnosed liver problems
• Infants born to infected mothers

• HDV is similar to HBV, and only occurs in its presence, so vaccination-protection for HDV is, for practical purposes, available.

• HEV is relatively mild and non-chronic; it produces symptoms similar to HAV and is transmitted similarly. However, no vaccine is available.

• HFV and HGV are newly identified; their connection with liver disease remains controversial.

*Hepatitis viruses are typically identified by letters, e.g. HAV for Hepatitis A Virus. Virus information is provided by the Center for Disease Control.

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