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  #1  
Old 10-30-2005, 06:11 PM
Emily
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Default If I brought GIANTmicrobes to school...

If I brought my GIANTmicrobes to school, they'd probably tell me to not take them anymore. We are not allowed to have stuffed animals at school, no matter how educational or awesome they are.

I think this is uncool. Don't you guys think they should let me bring 'em?
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  #2  
Old 11-03-2005, 02:11 PM
Nichol
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Thumbs up Microbes in school

I DO bring my GIANTmicrobes to school. But since I am the teacher, I do not get in trouble for it. I show them to my students and let them pass them around while I talk about microbiology.

Try talking to your teacher about sharing your GIANTmicrobes with your classmates. Show him/her the website for the "toys" so they know GIANTmicrobes are not just toys. If he/she gives you permission, then it should be OK.
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  #3  
Old 11-13-2005, 05:30 PM
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kskerr kskerr is offline
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I brought one of mine in to class with not problem, but then I was and am a college student... I brought strep throat into lab after we isolated strep from our own throats, no one had pathogenic strep in my class. The year before someone found out that she had it that way, the teacher told her to show the plate to her doctor. It was so cool, educational show and tell!
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  #4  
Old 11-15-2005, 05:19 PM
superbugeyes
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I'm doing a presentation on bioweapons and wanted to know if there are any pathogenic microbes I can get. I think they would be great visuals.
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Old 11-16-2005, 01:10 PM
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I'd go with the plague, that one is cool and I think there is a fear that it will be used as a bioweapon. Many of the stuffed microbes are pathogens but not used (that I know of) as bioweapons. Oh wait I think there was a case of salmonella being used by some religious cult on the west coast. Then you could always see if one is the same shape as a bioweapon and use it instead.
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  #6  
Old 11-16-2005, 04:55 PM
superbugeyes
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Thanks. I will probably do that.
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  #7  
Old 12-28-2005, 01:01 AM
Ebola Cactus
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I think if you knew they weren't going to take them, then taking them once wouldn't hurt. Being told not to bring them anymore isn't that bad ^_^ Compared to having them impounded.. poor microbes! aww.. I'd bring mine to school with me for health class presentations.
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  #8  
Old 01-08-2006, 01:53 PM
Vireyda
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I don't take mine to school they aren't really relevant to my majors of Geography and Anthropology, but if I ever had the chance to take them to class, I would.
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Old 01-11-2006, 10:49 PM
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Microbes are very relevant to geography and anthropology! Certain diseases are endemic to certain regions (lyme disease, rocky mountain spotted fever, African sleeping sickness, ect), and diseases are important in every culture . Perhaps if you talk to your teacher and explain how educational they are she might work them into a lecture (if she teaches any form of science or health) and then you could bring them legit and not have to worry about any trouble .
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  #10  
Old 01-12-2006, 04:50 AM
GERMan
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Good point!
I once talked a teacher of mine into not omitting virology if I gave a talk about viruses. Now imagine if I would've had cuddly flu with me then to swing opinion for this topic

You could as well go for sickle cell anemia's prevalence in tropical countries. Since it deforms red blood cells (in which plasmodiae live, in turn) it helps in a way to fend off the disease. In northern hemispheres, however, the variation is not as prevalent as it shows only mild downsides there (no malaria, but still you can't breathe as well).
Funny point: While the cells deform, crystallizing proteins build up needles that actually "pin up" the plasmodium Mean, isn't it?
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