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mazuac
09-16-2006, 11:07 AM
I would like to learn microbiology, and wright now, this would be the best way... perhaps kskerr and pollock might want to put some information about it on this thread, and anyone else... i would like to know about cells, well, thats what i wanna learn 1st... thank you!

Tuburculosis
09-16-2006, 11:07 AM
ill post a picture of the inside of cells soon!

Pollock II
09-16-2006, 12:04 PM
I really have no knowledge of microbiology compared to K. She'll help you with what you want to know. All I have are diagrams of cells from Biology, and we didn't really spend a long time on them.

Tuburculosis
09-16-2006, 02:00 PM
ill look one up.

mazuac
09-16-2006, 02:03 PM
wait... kskerr is a GIRL ?????!!!!????

Tuburculosis
09-16-2006, 02:04 PM
Yes!she Is!

mazuac
09-16-2006, 02:05 PM
oh... learn something new everyday...

Tuburculosis
09-16-2006, 02:06 PM
i thought giardia was a boy,till a few days ago.

mazuac
09-16-2006, 02:06 PM
i already new giardia was a girl wright from the beggining...:D

Tuburculosis
09-16-2006, 02:09 PM
ok,i didnt.

kskerr
09-16-2006, 02:21 PM
First off microbiology is the study of microorganisms, which include fungi, protists, bacteria, viruses, subviral particles, and prions. Fungi should be obvious, mushrooms, molds, and yeast. Protists include things like the amoeba, and giardia, they contain a defined nucleus and organelles are generally single celled but as I recall can also be multicellular. Bacteria are single celled organisms that do not contain a nucleus and pretty much lack organelles. Viruses are intracellular parasites, there is much debate as to whether or not they should be considered living organisms, they only contain genetic material and a shell to store it in. Subviral particles are generally just genetic material, sometimes with a package, they often need viruses to work. Prions are infectious protiens, such as mad cow disease, think of a protein as a sheet of paper that is supposed to be folded, the correct way works fine but then one that is not folded properly comes along and refolds the correctly folded one into the wrong fold and so it does not work right anymore and causes others to be folded wrong as well, that is how it works.

Cell Biology is the study of cells, sometimes it overlaps with microbiology but often it is focused on the cells of higher organisms, such as humans. Human and other higher organisms have cells which contain a nucleus and organelles.

My area of interest and the focus of my study is on bacteria. I have taken coursework in that and general microbiology, virology, genetics, cell biology, molecular biology (which was my undergraduate degree), and some advanced microbiology topics. I am not an expert in any of these areas but I likely know enough for this format as this is not a college class. You said you would like to know about cells. What about them, my cell biology text is the largest of my collection and it contains 1463 pages, this does not include the appendices, table of contents, ect. Do you want to know about animal cells, plant cells, bacteria....

mazuac
09-17-2006, 04:05 PM
my cousin wants to know if anyone here likes harry potter... sorry it's off the topic... and thank you kskerr! i see you didn't get hit byt the tornandoe

Tuburculosis
09-17-2006, 06:07 PM
i dont like it!

kskerr
09-17-2006, 07:12 PM
Harry Potter is a good series, I tend to like the books better than the movies though the movies are cute and tend to have great graphics.

mazuac
09-17-2006, 07:36 PM
yes, i agree! the books are quiet good 2. Oh, and kskerr, how did you come up with that name?

kskerr
09-17-2006, 07:59 PM
My mom came up with it when I was born, it is a condensed version of my full name. Nothing exciting :)

mazuac
09-17-2006, 08:13 PM
oh, okay, lol! :)

Pollock II
09-17-2006, 10:46 PM
Harry Potter is a good series, I tend to like the books better than the movies though the movies are cute and tend to have great graphics.


I love the books, and I love the movies despite their condensed nature.

kskerr
09-18-2006, 12:57 PM
I also like the movies but as is generally the case the books are better. I heard they are going to do the Dragonriders of Pern soon, I think the graphics are there for it but I hope they can capture at least some of the awesomeness of the books, love that world :D!

mazuac
09-18-2006, 03:12 PM
dragon riders of pern? never heard.... maybe i will go check it out...

kskerr
09-18-2006, 06:32 PM
It is an excellent series written by an awesome author, Ann McCaffrey, most of her books are great (in my humble oppinion ;))! Here is a link to the list of her dragon books: http://www.annemccaffrey.net/books/series/pern/chronology.html. I first encountered them in a short story in a reader in elementary school or jr high, then later found out there are full lenth books and such and think I have read them all by now...

mazuac
09-19-2006, 04:18 PM
my cousin herd of them! he loved it

kskerr
09-19-2006, 04:48 PM
What's not to love!!! :D

Tuburculosis
09-19-2006, 05:22 PM
yes!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

mazuac
09-19-2006, 05:32 PM
lol, cornelia funk wrote a book called "Dragon Rider" i loved it!

kskerr
09-19-2006, 11:14 PM
I'll have to look that one up when I have time.

Tuburculosis
09-20-2006, 06:14 AM
ive seen it.never read it,but want to!

kskerr
09-21-2006, 03:03 AM
E. coli O157:H7 is charactarised by its O (outer membrane carbohydrate, 157) and H (flagellar protien, 7) antigens. It is very similar to the nonpathogenic strains of E. coli, the main difference is it has extra genes which cause the disease state in humans. This organism can colonize cattle and not harm them in any way, these animals can shed the organism intermittantly and so it is difficult to detect which animals carry it and which do not. A cow's feces could test positive one day and for the next month consistantly test negative. If this organism caused symptoms in cattle it would be much easier to eliminate or reduce this organism. Most notable symptoms are potentially bloody diarrhea, cramps, and in some individuals, often the very young and old, it can cause acute kidney failure. It produces the same toxin that Shigella does, the causative agent of dysentery. It has a very low infectious dose, only 1-10 cells may be needed to cause infection, that makes detection of this organism even more difficult as many diagnostic tests require the organism to be present in much higher amounts to be detected.

On a positive note most strains of E. coli are nonpathogenic and many peacefully inhabit the human gut as well as other warm blooded animals and bird and provide benefits to their hosts. E. coli is also extensively used as a model organism in research (organism that is studied and other organisms are compared to), it has been enslaved to make insulin for diabetics, and other compounds of medical importance. It is also an excellent indicator of fecal contamination of water and food sources, in these cases they are not determining what kinds of E. coli are present just that they are.